Anti-consumerism essays

The animated short film — accompanied by a smartphone game — depicts a haunting parody of corporate agribusiness:

Anti-consumerism essays

Following Haraway and Butler in particular, the article argues for an emphasis on the relationality of reflexivity. Keywords activism; anti-consumerism; consumer culture; cultural economy; re? Maybe if we banged together the heads of all these activists and reconfigured the fragmented forces of identity politics into a new, empowered movement, maybe we could start winning again.

Anti Consumerism Essay. Jo Littler BEYOND THE BOYCOTT Anti-consumerism, cultural change and the limits of reflexivity This article focuses on the possibilities and limitations of reflexivity in contemporary anti-consumerism activist discourse. Rip Cronk in his essay Consumerism and the New Capitalism contended that the traditional Western society's values are degenerating under the influences of consumerism. For the public at large, the integrating and transformative experiences of culture have been replaced by the collective viewing experience and by participation in consumer trends. Better Essays words ( pages) Artist of the Postmodernist Movement, Barbara Kruger Sends a Message to the Public - Swallowing whole buses and buildings, the words of montage artist Barbara Kruger send messages to the public exemplifying problems with consumerism, feminism, and power.

Adbusters founder Kalle Lasn p. Anti-consumerism essays need to find a new kind of vivid privacy. Yet, whilst the study of consumer culture has notoriously expanded in a multitude of interdisciplinary directions over the past two decades MillerFeatherstoneSlaterNava et al. Most academic work has tended to focus on histories of consumer activism Hiltonand the little study of contemporary anti-consumerism there is Anti-consumerism essays is often more celebratory than critically interrogative.

In other words, I am arguing that we could use some of the tools offered to us by cultural studies to understand and engage with contemporary anti-consumerist activism.

Towards a consumerist critique of capitalism: A socialist defence of consumer culture | ephemera

I start from the premise, informed by these perspectives, that a crucial question regarding any political position is its relative capacity for reflexivity. In this paper, I pursue this point in one particular direction by thinking through the various ways in which anti-consumerism activist discourses can be B E YO N D T H E B OY C OT T understood as reflexive, by weighing up how they position themselves as contributing to social and cultural change, and by considering the possibilities and limitations of their various forms of reflexivity.

To do this I focus the discussion around four examples in particular, all of which relate, in their different ways, to various strands of anti-consumerism: These theories, whilst informing the account throughout, come to be foregrounded particularly in the last half of the paper, in which they are used to try to draw out the reflexive horizons of different forms of anti-consumerism.

I am interested in the possibility that two Anti-consumerism essays types of reflexivity might be identified at work in anti-consumerist discourse, as well as in cultural theory: As a researcher interested primarily in using and developing ways of understanding the cultural politics of consumer culture, as a subject who feels interpellated by many of these actions, as someone who has been imbricated in various ways with certain strands of anti-consumerist activism, and as many different types of consumer, my aim is at one and the same time to critique these discourses and think about how they might be developed.

As such, this paper therefore starts from a neoGramscian, post-Marxist premise in which wide-ranging coalitions, connected through commonalities, chains of equivalence and articulation are more politically fruitful than isolated avant-garde gestures.

Focusing on some of the possibilities and limitations of the reflexivity of current anti-consumerist C U LT U R A L S T U D I E S arguments, on how they figure change happening, and how they envisage their own roles, I am suggesting, can help us think about how these alternative systems of consumption are imagined as being brought into being.

The political, Anita Roddick states, for example, spinning around that old motif of second-wave feminism, is personal: But to Naomi Klein, focusing on the personal, on identity politics, has primarily been part of the problem: This tale of the co-option of left identity politics is a familiar one.

However, at the same time the narrative can demonstrate a reflexive awareness that it is addressing and privileging this particular constituency. She recalls, for example, the classroom tyrant who went around checking designer t-shirt labels were not fake; recounts selling brands in the clothes shop Esprit; and describes how she and her brother begged her wholemeal parents for fast food Kleinp.

In this way, it functions to make connections between the structures of feeling inhabited by her readership and the context of global socio-economic inequality and exploitation. This gives the text an affective pull that many other works analysing commodity fetishism do not always have.

As such, No Logo demonstrates the importance of taking into account the complexities of consumer identity, affect and desire when discussing alternative systems of consumption.

This is particularly marked in the context of anti-consumerist discourse, which has, historically, often been characterized by its inability to acknowledge consumer desire in anything other than reductive terms BelkGaltz For instance, might the focus on the interpellated individual consumer who is having their lifestyle connected to wider sites and frameworks of exploitation lead to an individualized consumer politics?

And how do such specific mattering maps map on to imagining wider social changes in systems and networks of consumption and production? To pick apart some of these issues we might start with the last question. Anti-consumerist activism in No Logo is positioned as contributing to cultural change in both explicit and implicit fashion.

Firstly, through the anti-capitalist activism which the second half of the book is devoted to documenting. At times, this can be presented in almost vanguardist mode. Descriptions of the protests and social movements taking place from Seattle onwards can be depicted as the leaders of an anti-consumer revolution whose expansion and victory is almost inevitable see Ritzer Secondly, activism works implicitly, through the function of the book itself.

This brings us to one of the most important, overlooked and problematic points about No Logo: In short, the issues of mainstreaming, coalition building and creating broad-based counterhegemonies.

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In effect, to discuss this is to discuss the role of the commodity of the book itself as a form of activism. Whilst No Logo has taken a fair amount of flak for being published by a subsidiary imprint of News Corporation Flamingo is owned by Harper Collins, which is owned by News Corporation the argument for why this mode of publication is in itself is a useful politics is that, by using these tools of the transnational corporations, it has a discursive reach, and a popularizing role, that would be denied to it if it had published with a small independent publisher.

Popular Anti Consumerism Books

It is simultaneously acted out and erased. This disjuncture directly relates to another:How advertising turned anti-consumerism into a secret weapon Adam Corner.

A still from Chipotle's 'Cultivate a better world' campaign. Adam Corner. is a research associate in psychology at Cardiff University. Syndicate this Essay. Get Aeon straight to your inbox. Join our newsletter Aeon is not-for-profit and free for everyone.

Make a. How advertising turned anti-consumerism into a secret weapon Adam Corner. A still from Chipotle's 'Cultivate a better world' campaign. Adam Corner. is a research associate in psychology at Cardiff University.

Essays Ideas Videos. About Contact Partners. RSS Feed Donate Community Guidelines. Better Essays words ( pages) Artist of the Postmodernist Movement, Barbara Kruger Sends a Message to the Public - Swallowing whole buses and buildings, the words of montage artist Barbara Kruger send messages to the public exemplifying problems with consumerism, feminism, and power.

The end of consumerism? Collaborative consumption – the notion that we can now share or swap anything from clothes and parking spaces .

Anti-consumerism essays

Anti-Consumerism in the Works of Kerouac, Ginsberg, and Roth After World War II, Americans became very concerned with "keeping up with the Joneses.".

Anti-consumerism is a sociopolitical ideology opposed to consumerism, which discourages ever-growing purchasing and consumption of material possessions. Anti-consumerist activists express concern over modern corporations or organizations that pursue solely economic goals at the expense of environmental, social, or ethical .

Anti-consumerism - Wikipedia