The common theme of carpe diem in to his coy mistress and to the virgins make much of time

Judi Ketteler Ketteler has taught literature and composition.

The commonality between "To His Coy Mistress," by Andrew Marvell, and "To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time," by Robert Herrick, is that in both poems, the speaker is using the "carpe diem" theme, which means "seize the day" or "live for today.

The common theme of carpe diem in to his coy mistress and to the virgins make much of time

The major difference I see is that Andrew Marvell is doing his best to woo the woman he is speaking to into having an affair with him. He tells her that by saving her virginity, she may end up taking it to the grave with her: To the typical Cavalier poet, it was about having fun today without worrying about tomorrow.

The common theme of carpe diem in to his coy mistress and to the virgins make much of time

Marvell speaks of the passing of time, as it races by, and reasons the woman should follow his advice: Like a demon, time is personified as an entity that races to overcome him, to steal his youth. Vast eternity awaits us all, but he is speaking as to how she will end up there: Marvell is trying to get this woman to come around to his way of thinking.

Herrick, on the other hand, seems simply to suggest that every person should enjoy youth while he or she may, and never take it for granted.

To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time by Robert Herrick - Poems | leslutinsduphoenix.com

He is giving sound advice, but not because there is something he wants, as does Marvell. Herrick is simply saying youth passes very quickly and then is gone: In essence, the topic of both poems is the same, but Marvell wants to get a certain young woman into bed with "no strings"while Herrick is more interested in warning the young to use their youth wisely, and he is purporting relationships joined not in lust but by marriage.Carpe Diem: Poems for Making the Most of Time - Read a selection of carpe diem poems by classical poets, such as Horace and Robert Herrick, to contemporary poet, such as .

While it is only Herrick’s “Corinna’s Going AMaying” that can appropriately be compared with Marvell’s “To His Coy Mistress,” it is the older poet’s “To the Virgins, to make much of Time” that has fixed the concept of carpe diem in the popular imagination forever.

The commonality between "To His Coy Mistress," by Andrew Marvell, and "To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time," by Robert Herrick, is that in both poems, the speaker is using the "carpe diem" theme.

Born on August 24, , Robert Herrick was the seventh child and fourth son born to a London goldsmith, Nicholas, and his wife, Julian Stone Herrick. When Herrick was fourteen months old, his father died. At age 16, Herrick began a ten-year apprenticeship with his uncle.

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To Virgins, to make much of time by Robert Herrick in the two poems, "To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time," by Robert Herrick and "To His Coy Mistress" by Andrew Marvell. Robert Herrick's, "To the Virgins, The speaker in this poem uses carpe diem as its theme proposes that since death is unavoidable and time is passing.

The Theme of Carpe Diem in Robert Herrick's To the Virgins to Make Much of Time Words 4 Pages Robert Herrick's poem, "To the Virgins to Make Much of Time," focuses on the idea of carpe diem.

To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time - Wikipedia